Calibration and Equipment Repair

  • Sound Level Meters
  • Noise Dosimeters
  • Air Samplers
  • Field Flow Calibrators
  • Gas Detectors
  • Velocity Meters
  • Indoor Air Quality Meters
  • Heat Stress Monitors
  • Temperature / RH
  • Particle Counters
  • Dust Monitors
  • Flow Hoods

Noise Dosimeters and Sound Level Meter Calibration

Hearing loss is a significant factor in poor communication between workers and the cause of severe accidents.  OSHA’s hearing conservation standard demands that workplaces survey their work spaces for noise sources and employees that are at risk from damage to high noise.  Sound level meters and noise dosimeters are essential measuring tools in determination of those that are subject to inclusion in the hearing conservation program, engineering controls, administrative controls, and personal protective devices.  It is the employer’s responsibility first to investigate whether engineered noise control measures are feasible, to keep the noise levels acceptably low to alleviate the need for hearing protectors.

Providing ear plugs or muffs for noisy environments does not fully satisfy OSHA requirements. Instead, it is the employer’s responsibility first to investigate whether engineered noise control measures are feasible, to keep the noise levels acceptably low to alleviate the need for hearing protectors.  This responsibility means that the noise and vibration expert must know more than just how to measure the sound levels throughout the facility.  The safety professional or consultant must also be expert in the more detailed task of identifying the key sources of sound and vibration, determining which sources must be reduced, and recommending specific noise control measures.

(OSHA) 29 CFR 1910.95. Occupational noise can be deafening, cause permanent hearing damage, cause communication breakdown, or cause dangerous distractions in the workplace.  A good part of any hearing conservation program is routine monitoring of new employees, new processes, and changes in equipment or personnel.  Sound level meters and noise dosimeters get damaged in a variety of ways including dosimeter microphone cord stretching, scratched microphones, and dropped meters.

Sound level meters are useful in determining occupational and environmental noise concerns.  For industrial noise, a sound level meter may be used to determine the location of noise sources, timing, and where certain employees may become exposed. A noise dosimeter is a specialized sound level meter intended specifically to measure the noise exposure of a person integrated over a period of a workday and to comply with OSHA. Noise dosimeters measure and store sound pressure levels (SPL) and, by integrating these measurements over time, provide a cumulative noise-exposure reading for a given period of time, such as an 8-hour workday. Dosimeters can function as personal or area noise monitors. In occupational settings, personal noise dosimeters are often worn on the body of a worker with the microphone mounted on the middle-top of the person’s most exposed shoulder.

Why calibrate your noise dosimeter and sound level meters?

  • Our current inspection standard meets ISO/IEC 17025:2005 and ANSI S1.4-1983(R2006).
  • A thorough check of all functional components, there are many.
  • We use the best NIST traceable components in our ISO 17025 accredited sound meter calibration lab.

CIH calibrates both noise dosimeters and sound level monitors. Sound level meters are commonly used in noise pollution studies for the quantification of different kinds of noise, especially for industrial, environmental and aircraft noise. Our current inspection standard meets ISO/IEC 17025:2005 and ANSI S1.4-1983(R2006).

A noise dosimeter is a specialized sound level meter intended specifically to measure the noise exposure of a person integrated over a period of time; usually to comply with Health and Safety regulations such as the Occupational Safety and Health (OSHA) 29 CFR 1910.95. Noise dosimeters measure and store sound pressure levels (SPL) and, by integrating these measurements over time, provide a cumulative noise-exposure reading for a given period of time, such as an 8-hour workday. Dosimeters can function as personal or area noise monitors. In occupational settings, personal noise dosimeters are often worn on the body of a worker with the microphone mounted on the middle-top of the person’s most exposed shoulder.

Sound Level Meter Calibration

Regulations (like the 2005 Control of Noise at Work Regulations) state that a sound level meter should be returned every two years and the Acoustic Calibrator every year. However, the more often you have the sound level meter calibrated, the less risk of your measurements being questioned. I always recommend erring on the side of caution, especially when you are measuring to Standards, Regulations and Guidelines.

Noise Dosimeter Calibration

Equipment manufacturers typically recommend periodic calibration on an annual basis. These rigorous testing protocols ensure that the electronic components are in good working order and detect shifts in performance that indicate gradual deterioration. Periodic calibration results in a calibration certificate documenting the standard of performance. Typically, the instrument will also receive a sticker indicating its last calibration date and when the next periodic calibration is due.

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